Tag Archive: Oz Asia

Sep 26

FAIRWEATHER – OZ ASIA FESTIVAL – 4.5K

An evocative, haunting multimedia performance incorporating spoken word, visual imagery and music, “Fairweather” is based on the life and work of the enigmatic artist Ian Fairweather. Composer Erik Griswold, artist Glen Henderson, and poet/narrator Rodney Hall have come together to present his story in a way that reflects Fairweather’s paintings : their multi-layered nature, rhythm …

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Sep 19

Oz Asia Festival – 2016 – Cinema Program

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By Tom Eckert   One thing that the 2016 OzAsia festival’s Cinema program can be proud of is its diversity, in many facets. The program respects a wide range of geographical locations from subcontinental India in Psycho Raman, to the mountains of Tibet in Paths of the Soul and the metropolises of Korea in Train …

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Sep 19

Oz Asia Festival – 2016 – Paths of the Soul – Yang Zhang – Mercury Cinema – 4K

By Tom Eckert Yang Zhang’s Paths of the Soul is a deeply meditative experience that touches on the deep spirituality of native Tibetans in an idiosyncratic pilgrimage journey of 2,000km to their most holy site made, unbelievably, whilst prostrating themselves to pray every few steps. The cinematography is simultaneously deeply respectful and awe-inspiring. Keeping his …

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Sep 19

Oz Asia Festival – 2016 – Paths of the Soul – Yang Zhang – Mercury Cinema – 4K

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By Tom Eckert Yang Zhang’s documentary Paths of the Soul is a deeply meditative and privileged vision of an idiosyncratic Tibetan Buddhist pilgrimage ritual that sees them traveling 2,000km to their holy capital whilst throwing themselves prostrate every few steps. The cinematography is simultaneously deeply respectful and awe-inspiring. Keeping his distance, Zhang never allows the …

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Sep 18

Oz Asia Festival – 2016 – Stranger – Emek Tursunov – 4K

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By Tom Eckert   Stranger is the completion of Ermek Tursunov’s trilogy examining the Kazakh identity. Whilst described as apolitical by the director, Stranger is set in the times leading up to world war two after its protagonist defies to Soviet Union by not serving in the military following a situation where his father dies …

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